Ending the Essay: Conclusions

Writing a conclusion to an essay should never be underrated. It is your last time to convince your audience to accept your standpoint or create a good impression of yourself in their minds. Also, your conclusion can create a lasting impression among them after reading your piece. They will then decide whether to read your other works.

In essence, your conclusion should wholly complete or bring closure to the topic, create fulfillment among readers, or create an avenue for future debates.

This means the end of an essay carries lots of weight. In closing your essay, here are some points to consider.

Create a link between the introduction and the conclusion

In the first paragraph/introduction, you stated clearly the purpose of the piece in the thesis statement. Therefore, you would need to reiterate those points in the conclusion. You can choose a phrase or some words from there to close your essay.

 Make it simple to understand 

Your conclusion should be in plain words. There is no need to confuse your readers with complicated wording when concluding your work. It would be best if the sentence were constructed mostly of one-syllable words.  

Don’t start a new idea 

All new points or arsenals you have should be in the body paragraph. Any attempt to introduce a new position in your conclusion would create uncertainty among readers.

Ask a top provoking question

Asking critical questions in your conclusion could persuade your readers to take action or continue to read more on the subject matter. It can also create a new conversation on the topic.

Closing your essay without bringing closure to the topic

Use a quotation

You can use a quotation or reference to the primary source of your work to conclude your essay. However, the quote should be relevant and echo your main points or creates a different perspective. 

Creates a broader or different perspective 

If, for example, you are writing about feminism, you can conclude your essay by linking the activities of feminist in the 1950s to what we have today.

Redefining a critical point in the essay

Let’s say you are writing on Marx's views of the conflict between wage labor and capital; you can start with his claim that "capitalist economy is . . . a gigantic enterprise of dehumanization.” You then end by saying his point of view is also demeaning since it agrees with basic economics and has no moral bases.

It would help if you considered the effects of your piece

So in all, what do you seek to achieve with your essay? What are you suggesting or defending? For example, if you are writing a rhetorical analysis essay, the novel Ambiguous Adventure by Cheikh Hamidou Kane, you can start by inferring that the position of the main character suggests Kane’s belief in why to incorporate Western materialism and Sufi spirituality in present-day Senegal. You may, therefore, conclude that with a related point that overall, the novel suggests the possibility or not of such integration.